In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory will mark the Centennial of its founding. This occasion provides an opportunity to review the state-of-the-art in understanding of how Hawaiian volcanoes work and to assess the most important problems requiring future research. The “Hawaiian Volcanoes: From Source to Surface” Chapman Conference will include both invited and contributed talks, as well as contributed posters. Topical sessions will be organized to follow a packet of magma from its point of origin to the surface, with day-long discussions devoted to (1) magma origin and ascent; (2) magma storage and volcano evolution; (3) volcanic eruptions and degassing; and (4) the future of research into Hawaiian volcanism.

Specific conference objectives are to:

  • establish the state of current knowledge of Hawaiian volcanism across multiple disciplines and processes
  • explore how a better understanding of Hawaiian volcanoes can be applied to volcanoes elsewhere on Earth and other planets, and vice versa
  • identify the most important questions that should be the focus for future research into how Hawaiian volcanoes work
  • provide a multidisciplinary forum for the exchange of ideas and new technologies/methodologies
  • stimulate the formation of multidisciplinary collaborations that will address key research questions
  • facilitate transfer of knowledge between scientists in different disciplines and career levels

In addition, conference attendees will be invited to contribute to a planned AGU monograph on Hawaiian volcanism that should serve as a resource for researchers for years to come.